What does persecution look like in China?

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Pray for China

  • Pray that, despite intense surveillance, faith will flourish in China and more people will discover God’s love.
  • Ask God to help local Open Doors partners be able to reach vulnerable Christians with vital Christian literature, training and fellowship. Ask Him to help believers persevere in their walk with Him.
  • Pray for the authorities in China to recognize the importance of religious freedom, and allow the church to gather and worship without restrictions.

What does persecution look like in China?

Surveillance in China is among the most oppressive and sophisticated in the world. Church attendance is rigorously monitored, and many churches are being closed down—whether they are independent or belong to the Three-Self Patriotic Movement (the officially state-sanctioned Protestant church in China). It remains illegal for under-18s to attend church. All meetings venues had to close during the COVID-19 crisis, but some churches were forced to remain closed once restrictions began to lift, and were quietly phased out. The old truth that churches will only be perceived as being a threat if they become too large, too political or invite foreign guests, is an unreliable guideline.

Christian leaders are generally the main target of government surveillance, and a very small number have been abducted. “They are simply snatched away,” says an Open Doors source, “only to appear months later in a kind of house arrest, where they get re-educated.’’

If someone is discovered to have converted from Islam or Tibetan Buddhism, their family and community will usually threaten or abuse them. Their husbands may be pressured to divorce them, to persuade them to reconvert. Neighbors may report any Christian activities to the authorities or the village head, who would take action to stop believers.

Read more here —> https://www.opendoorsusa.org/christian-persecution/world-watch-list/china/


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