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Our culture has gone profane. The immoral is seen as virtuous. Adulterers are held up in glory. Pornography abounds. Our attitudes have run a muck.

Or is that really true?

So what do Americans really think.

From the modesty debate to the mainstreaming of “twerking,” the American public has a complex relationship with sex. Ever since the sexual revolution of the 1960s, the liberalization of social and moral attitudes toward sex has met with a conservative backlash troubled by the impact of an increasingly sexualized culture.

So what do Americans think about sex? What is its purpose, and where should we have it? And what do people think about traditional sexual ethics? Are they outdated? In a recent study, Barna Group asked about these and other questions related to sex—and discovered there is no broadly shared consensus among American adults.

Half of U.S. adults (50%) agree strongly that “choosing not to have sex outside of marriage is healthy.” But generational differences are significant. Six in 10 Elders (59%) agree strongly with this statement, compared to 53 percent of Boomers, 49 percent of Gen-Xers and 43 percent of Millennials.

Practicing Christians (72%) are almost twice as likely as adults of no faith (38%) to say that choosing not to have sex outside marriage is a healthy choice. Women (56%) are more likely than men (43%) to hold this view. Compared to those who have never been married (41%), people who are married (53%) and, somewhat surprisingly, cohabitating adults (49%) are more likely to strongly agree with the statement.

Source: Barna Group – Knowledge to navigate a changing world

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