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I think it has some merit to consider that the sex-abuse crisis in US Catholic Church is about homosexuality, not pedophilia. The Catholic Church needs to seriously reconsider it practice on male only priests and celibacy.

Catholic Priests are facing a dramatic moment in the history of the Roman Catholic Church. It seemed like only yesterday when we heard about the initial allegations of sexual abuse within the Catholic priesthood that were surfacing in the Boston area.

Since that time, over 300 lawsuits have been filed in the United States. This scandal has shaken faith in the Roman Catholic Church, and raised questions about basic tenets of the priesthood, including the vow of celibacy and the ordination of women. These allegations are especially disturbing for three reasons.

  • Parents trusted these men with their teenagers and children in the parochial education system, as well as in church service. That trust has been severely damaged.
  • The Catholic Church leadership has known of these abuses for years, yet it took a public outcry in order for them to be motivated to take remedial action.
  • Jesus the Messiah spoke specifically about the victimization of innocent children.

But whosoever shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea.

Matthew 18:6 KJV

These acts of molestation and lewd conduct seem to be rooted in homosexuality, rather than pedophilia. The exploited victims have been teenage boys (rather than prepubescents of either sex, the normal victims of pedophiles). This “Church secret” has been hidden for decades, with dialogue limited to lowered voices, and with lawsuits settled quietly.

Attorney and international child rights advocate Liz Yore and Senior Editor for The Catholic Thing Brad Miner made it clear for Raymond Arroyo on The World Over Thursday night that the Catholic Church’s sex abuse crisis has a direct link to homosexuality.

The two discussed with Arroyo the fact that throughout the Church’s sexual abuse crisis, it has been mostly teenage boys and men subjected to the abuse.

“Largely it’s not a pedophile crisis,” Yore said. “We know from the John Jay report, 81-percent of the victims were males, mostly teens. And we know because our subclass of predators are all male, this is a male-on-male crime, and primarily with teens between the ages of 14 to 17. Those are the victims.”

Source: Sex-abuse crisis in US Catholic Church is about homosexuality, not pedophilia: EWTN panel | News | LifeSite

Bishop Comments on Celibacy

This statement shocked me.

Cardinal Wuerl needs to resign. Sign the petition here.

Bishop Morlino’s take

Bishop Robert Morlino of Madison, Wisconsin, issued the most powerful letter to date from a U.S bishop in the wake of the most recent sex abuse scandals.

In the pastoral letter to his diocese, Morlino speaks with utter clarity about the “depravity” that has been allowed to fester in the Church and insists it must be “rooted out” even from within the U.S. episcopate.

“It is time to admit that there is a homosexual subculture within the hierarchy of the Catholic Church that is wreaking great devastation in the vineyard of the Lord,” he writes.

The sex abuse crisis has continued, he says, because the modern Church has become too comfortable with sin in her teaching and practice.

“For too long we have diminished the reality of sin – we have refused to call a sin a sin – and we have excused sin in the name of a mistaken notion of mercy,” he writes. “In our efforts to be open to the world we have become all too willing to abandon the Way, the Truth, and the Life.”

He continues:

We must be done with sin. It must be rooted out and again considered unacceptable. Love sinners? Yes. Accept true repentance? Yes. But do not say sin is okay. And do not pretend that grave violations of office and of trust come without grave, lasting consequences.

For the Church, the crisis we face is not limited to the McCarrick affair, or the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report, or anything else that may come. The deeper crisis that must be addressed is the license for sin to have a home in individuals at every level of the Church. There is a certain comfort level with sin that has come to pervade our teaching, our preaching, our decision making, and our very way of living.

If you’ll permit me, what the Church needs now is more hatred! As I have said previously, St. Thomas Aquinas said that hatred of wickedness actually belongs to the virtue of charity. As the Book of Proverbs says “My mouth shall meditate truth, and my lips shall hate wickedness (Prov. 8:7).” It is an act of love to hate sin and to call others to turn away from sin.

The bishop urges the faithful to unite with him and the clergy of his diocese “in making public and private acts of reparation to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for all the sins of sexual depravity committed by members of the clergy and episcopacy.”

He says he will be offering a special Mass on September 14, the Feast of the Triumph of the Cross, and is asking all clergy, religious, and diocesan personnel to fast and abstain from meat during the Church’s traditional Autumn Ember Days on September 19, 21, and 22.

“Some sins, like some demons, can only be driven out by prayer and fasting,” he writes.

“Right now there is a lot of justified anger and passion coming from many holy and faithful lay people and clerics across the country, calling for real reform and ‘house cleaning’ of this type of depravity. I stand with them,” he concludes. “I don’t know yet how this will play out nationally or internationally. But I do know this, and I make this my last point and last promise, for the Diocese of Madison: ‘As for me and my household, we will serve the Lord.’

Cardinal Burke

Cardinal Burke is cardinal prelate of the Roman Catholic Church and a leader of its conservative wing. He is an archbishop and the patron of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. He served as the archbishop of the Archdiocese of St. Louis, Missouri, from 2003 to 2008 and as the bishop of the Diocese of La Crosse, Wisconsin, from 1995 to 2004. He was Prefect of the Apostolic Signatura from June 2008 until November 2014.

Cardinal Raymond Burke addressed the new wave of clergy abuse scandal giving insights and observations as to how it needs to be addressed.

In an interview with Thomas McKenna of Catholic Action for Faith and Family, Cardinal Burke discussed the recent scandals involving clergy and members of the hierarchy.

Cardinal Wuerl needs to resign. Sign the petition here. 

When asked about what is at the root of the crisis Cardinal Burke said “it seems clear in light of these recent terrible scandals that indeed there is a homosexual culture, not only among the clergy but even within the hierarchy, which needs to be purified at the root. It is of course a tendency that is disordered.” He highlighted that “it has been considerably aggravated by the anti-life culture in which we live, namely the contraceptive culture that separates the sexual act from the conjugal union.”

When asked about ways of addressing the situation he stated: “There is no need to develop new procedures. All of the procedures exist in the Church’s discipline, and they have existed throughout the centuries. What is needed is an honest investigation into the alleged situations of grave immorality followed by effective action to sanction those responsible and to be vigilant to prevent that similar situations arise again.”

He explained that the Church has procedures and disciplines that have existed for centuries but that they need to be enforced.

He concluded by explaining that the faithful should never be discouraged or give up hope because the faithful must always “trust in Our Lord.”

The full interview with Cardinal Burke

Thomas McKenna: Your Eminence, a new wave of clergy sexual abuse has surfaced and is indicating a widespread practice of homosexuality among clergy in dioceses and seminaries across the country. What would you say is the root cause of this corruption?

Cardinal Raymond Burke: It was clear after the studies following the 2002 sexual abuse crisis that most of the acts of abuse were in fact homosexual acts committed with adolescent young men. There was a studied attempt to either overlook or to deny this. Now it seems clear in light of these recent terrible scandals that indeed there is a homosexual culture, not only among the clergy but even within the hierarchy, which needs to be purified at the root. It is of course a tendency that is disordered.

I think it has been considerably aggravated by the anti-life culture in which we live, namely the contraceptive culture that separates the sexual act from the conjugal union. The sexual act has no meaning whatsoever except between a man and a woman in marriage since the conjugal act is by its very nature for procreation. I believe that there needs to be an open recognition that we have a very grave problem of a homosexual culture in the Church, especially among the clergy and the hierarchy, that needs to be addressed honestly and efficaciously.

Thomas: Your Eminence, many are saying what needs to be done to address this problem is to determine better procedures and structures to deal with it and that this then would be a solution to resolve the situation. Do you agree with that proposal? Or what do you see needs to be done to resolve this crisis in a thorough manner?

Cardinal Burke: There is no need to develop new procedures. All of the procedures exist in the Church’s discipline, and they have existed throughout the centuries. What is needed is an honest investigation into the alleged situations of grave immorality followed by effective action to sanction those responsible and to be vigilant to prevent that similar situations arise again.

This idea that the conference of bishops should be responsible for addressing this is misguided because the bishops’ conference does not have surveillance over the bishops within the conference. It is the Roman Pontiff, the Holy Father, who has the responsibility to discipline these situations, and it is he who needs to take action following the procedures that are given in the Church’s discipline. This is what will address the situation effectively.

Thomas: Your Eminence, the faith of many in the Church, as a holy rather than corrupt institution, has been shaken. People don’t know what to think about their bishops and their priests. How should the faithful respond to this crisis, especially taking into consideration that many are feeling discouraged and ashamed of their Church?

Cardinal Burke: I understand fully the anger, the profound sense of betrayal that many of the faithful are feeling, even as I experience it myself. The faithful should insist that the situation be addressed honestly and with determination. What we must never permit is that these gravely immoral acts, which have sullied so much the face of the Church, permit us to lose trust in Our Lord, who is the Head and Shepherd of the flock. The Church is His Mystical Body, and we must never lose sight of that truth.

We should be profoundly ashamed of what certain shepherds, certain bishops, have done, but we should never be ashamed of the Church because we know that it is pure and that it is Christ Himself, alive for us in the Church, Who alone is our way to salvation. There is a great temptation that our justified anger over these gravely immoral acts will lead us to lose faith in the Church or to be angry with the Church, instead of angry with those who, even though they held the highest authority in the Church, have betrayed that authority and have acted in an immoral way.

There existed in the Roman Pontifical (the Latin Catholic liturgical book that contains the rites performed by bishops) for centuries the rites for the degradation of clerics and also of hierarchy who had failed gravely in their office. I believe it would be helpful to read over again those rites to understand deeply what the Church has always understood, which is that shepherds can go astray, even in a grave way, and then must be appropriately disciplined and even dismissed from the clerical state.

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